Khan Worm

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Khan Worm.jpgKhanWormV2.png
Khan Worm
Powers and Abilities Able to control a person's actions after it enters their brain through their ear and enhances the strength of its host.
Variant feeds off bodily fluid, victim will kill and drink blood of others.
Vulnerabilities Electrocution/Variant by dehydration
Appearance Like a slug crossed with a centipede; variant has more pronounced pincers.
Episode(s) 6.16 ...And Then There Were None
10.15 The Things They Carried

You haven't got a name for me yet. I'm new around here. Eve cooked me up herself.

– Khan worm, 6.16 ...And Then There Were None

History

The Khan worm is a monster newly created by Eve after she is released from Purgatory.[1][2] Although it looks like a cross between a simple slug and a centipede, it is a self-aware, intelligent parasite that can enter a person's ear and take control over their actions as well as access their memories. After it leaves its host's body, a black, gooey substance is deposited in the person's ear. Other names: Herpe and Sluggo (by Dean).[2]

A second form of the Khan worm exists that does not take control of the host body.[3] This variety absorbs all bodily fluids, eventually causing the host to go mad with thirst, drinking any liquids they can find, and eventually forcing the host to kill and drink the fluids from other people (blood, organs, marrow, etc...). This version of the worm acts more as a parasite, drying out their hosts and moving on; it also appears to have originated in the Middle East, though how long it has existed is unknown.

Characteristics

Powers and Abilities

Type 1

  • Can control their victims' actions and access their memories once it has entered their body through the ear.
  • Increase the strength of the host bodies they possess.
  • Can reanimate a host body's corpse if it has been killed.

Type 2

  • Immune to electrocution.
  • Enters body through the mouth and feeds on their bodily fluids, which increases their need to remain hydrated.
  • Increase the strength of the host bodies they possess.

Weakness

Type 1

  • Electrocution - A current of electricity can stun or kill a Khan Worm depending on its intensity and duration.

Type 2

  • Dehydration - Rapid dehydration will force an offshoot version of the Khan Worm to leave the host body exposing it to hunters.

Episodes

The Khan worm being ejected from Bobby Singer.

6.16 ...And Then There Were None

Eve originally plants the parasitic creature in the ear of a trucker named Rick, and it goes on to kill Rick's family. The creature then possesses one of the trucker's co-workers, who kills 6 people at the Starlight Cannery. While investigating the murders at the cannery, Dean is possessed and the creature uses him to kill his cousin Gwen. After it leaves Dean's ear, he tells Sam, Samuel, Bobby, and Rufus that it is like a Khan worm on steroids, and also refers to it as a "twelve inch long herpe." It then possesses Samuel, who is killed by Sam. When Bobby and Rufus resolve to cut open Samuel's head to check for the newly dubbed Khan Worm, it animates Samuel's dead body and fights them. During the struggle, Samuel's body is thrown back against exposed wiring and electrocuted, and the Khan worm is stunned before retreating to possess someone else. The hunters are unsure who is possessed and so shock each other one at a time to try to reveal the Khan worm. While possessing Bobby, it quickly stabs and kills Rufus, but Sam and Dean overpower him and cover Bobby's ears and nose with duct tape so that the Khan worm cannot escape. It tells them that it doesn't have a name yet because it is a new monster recently created by Eve, who intends for supernatural beings to take over the world. They electrocute Bobby until it falls out of his ear, dead.

Cole in the middle of being infected.

10.15 The Things They Carried

Sam and Dean investigate a murder suicide where an Special Forces vet killed another vet, and drank her blood. His widow reports he had an insatiable thirst before he died. The Winchesters discover another member of the same squad, Kit Verson, is experiencing similar symptoms. They visit his wife Jemma, and she confirms this, and reports he is missing. As they leave Cole Trenton is waiting for them. Cole is a friend of Kit's and wants to help - and ensure Sam and Dean don't kill Kit.

Cole finds out from a military contact that the squad concerned was on a mission to rescue a POW held at the Najaf cemetery in Iraq. Footage from the mission shows that the POW was crazed, and was probably the source of infection.

Cole and the Winchesters find that Kit has killed a man at a convenience store. Cole finds out that Kit may have gone to his father's cabin, and takes off to find him. At the cabin, Kit attacks Cole and a Khan worm, leaves his body and enters Cole through his mouth. Sam and Dean arrive, having tailed Cole, but are unable to capture Kit.

Sam takes off after Kit, and Dean attempts to expel the worm from Cole using electrocution, which had worked previously. Despite repeated efforts, it has no effects. Cole and Dean then come up with the idea of dehydrating Cole to drive out the worm, so they light a fire and turn the cabin into a virtual sauna. While Cole attacks Dean twice eventually it works, and the worm leaves Cole and Dean kills it.

Meanwhile Kit has returned home and crazed with thirst, attacks his wife. Sam arrives and saves her and ties up Kit. However he escapes and Sam has to kill him.

Trivia

  • Dean and Bobby both refer to it as the Khan worm because it is reminiscent of the Ceti eel from the Star Trek movie Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan which after entering through the ear, wrapped itself around a person's brain stem causing extreme pain before making them susceptible to suggestion, and eventually causing madness and death. It was referenced also in 2009's Star Trek reboot in the form of the Centaurian slug which entered through the mouth and also wrapped itself around a person's brain stem and released a toxin which made people susceptible to speaking the truth.

See also

References